Quantum Beat Photoelectron Imaging Spectroscopy of Xe in the VUV

Quantum Beat Photoelectron Imaging Spectroscopy of Xe in the VUV

New on arXiv

Time-resolved pump-probe measurements of Xe, pumped at 133~nm and probed at 266~nm, are presented. The pump pulse prepared a long-lived hyperfine wavepacket, in the Xe 5p5(2P1/2)6s 2[1/2]1 manifold (E=77185 cm1=9.57 eV). The wavepacket was monitored via single-photon ionization, and photoelectron images measured. The images provide angle- and time-resolved data which, when obtained over a large time-window (900~ps), constitute a precision quantum beat spectroscopy measurement of the hyperfine state splittings. Additionally, analysis of the full photoelectron image stack provides a quantum beat imaging modality, in which the Fourier components of the photoelectron images correlated with specific beat components can be obtained. This may also permit the extraction of isotope-resolved photoelectron images in the frequency domain, in cases where nuclear spins (hence beat components) can be uniquely assigned to specific isotopes (as herein), and also provides phase information. The information content of both raw, and inverted, image stacks is investigated, suggesting the utility of the Fourier analysis methodology in cases where images cannot be inverted.

Also available on Authorea.

Full data, code & analysis notes on OSF.

Time-bin-to-polarization conversion of ultrafast photonic qubits

Time-bin-to-polarization conversion of ultrafast photonic qubits

Connor Kupchak, Philip J. Bustard, Khabat Heshami, Jennifer Erskine, Michael Spanner, Duncan G. England, and Benjamin J. Sussman
Phys. Rev. A 96, 053812 – Published 6 November 2017

The encoding of quantum information in photonic time-bin qubits is apt for long-distance quantum communication schemes. In practice, due to technical constraints such as detector response time, or the speed with which copolarized time-bins can be switched, other encodings, e.g., polarization, are often preferred for operations like state detection. Here, we present the conversion of qubits between polarization and time-bin encodings by using a method that is based on an ultrafast optical Kerr shutter and attain efficiencies of 97% and an average fidelity of 0.827±0.003 with shutter speeds near 1 ps. Our demonstration delineates an essential requirement for the development of hybrid and high-rate optical quantum networks.

Bootstrapping to the Molecular Frame with Time-domain Photoionization Interferometry

Bootstrapping to the Molecular Frame with Time-domain Photoionization Interferometry

Update Jan 2018 – a presentation covering this work was given at the PQE conference, video and slides are available online.

Update August 2017 – this article is now published in PRL, under the alternative title Molecular Frame Reconstruction Using Time-Domain Photoionization Interferometry.
Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 083401 (2017), DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.083401

(Feb 2017) New manuscript on the arxiv:

Bootstrapping to the Molecular Frame with Time-domain Photoionization Interferometry

 

Photoionization of molecular species is, essentially, a multi-path interferometer with both experimentally controllable and intrinsic molecular characteristics. In this work, XUV photoionization of impulsively aligned molecular targets (N2) is used to provide a time-domain route to “complete” photoionization experiments, in which the rotational wavepacket controls the geometric part of the photoionization interferometer. The data obtained is sufficient to determine the magnitudes and phases of the ionization matrix elements for all observed channels, and to reconstruct molecular frame interferograms from lab frame measurements. In principle this methodology provides a time-domain route to complete photoionization experiments, and the molecular frame, which is generally applicable to any molecule (no prerequisites), for all energies and ionization channels.

arxiv 1701.08432 (2017)

Supplementary material (theory, data and code) available at DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.4480349.

Angle-resolved RABBIT: theory and numerics

Angle-resolved RABBIT: theory and numerics

Update 28/06/17 – Now published in J. Phys. B, special issue on Correlations in Light-Matter Interactions.

New manuscript:

Angle-resolved RABBIT: theory and numerics

P. Hockett

Angle-resolved (AR) RABBIT measurements offer a high information content measurement scheme, due to the presence of multiple, interfering, ionization channels combined with a phase-sensitive observable in the form of angle and time-resolved photoelectron interferograms. In order to explore the characteristics and potentials of AR-RABBIT, a perturbative 2-photon model is developed; based on this model, example AR-RABBIT results are computed for model and real systems, for a range of RABBIT schemes. These results indicate some of the phenomena to be expected in AR-RABBIT measurements, and suggest various applications of the technique in photoionization metrology.

Paul Hockett 2017 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 50 154002

Pre-print available via Authorea, DOI: 10.22541/au.149037518.89916908.

arXiv 1703.08586 (2017) 

See also the recent AR-RABBIT presentation for a brief intro to this topic.

Open Science Initiative

Open Science Initiative

Open science – the practice of making full research projects open and accessible, from inception to publication – is an increasingly important topic, and even appearing in the popular press, particularly with regard to transparency and reproducible in research… hence open science can be viewed as the opposite of bad science.

John Arnold Made a Fortune at Enron. Now He’s Declared War on Bad Science

Open science (along with the more general notion of open data) is also part of the Canadian Government’s Open Government action plan, which includes the statement that:

The Government of Canada will maximize access to federally-funded scientific research to encourage greater collaboration and engagement with the scientific community, the private sector, and the public.

 

As part of our work towards open science, our articles are increasingly available on open platforms (arXiv, Authorea). And, now, good things are happening with our data too. Thanks to the Open Science Foundation (OSF) and Figshare, it’s now easy to share data, code etc. and make it citable with a DOI.

Some of our recent open science data can be found at:

Time-dependent Wavepackets and Photoionization – CS2 (2013 – present)

Our ongoing work on the calculation of time-dependent wavepackets and observables in photoionization is now collected in an OSF project (DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/RJMPD). Aspects of this work have previously been published, but much of the detail and methodology underlying the calculations has remained sitting on our computers. As part of our Open Science Initiative, we’re letting this data go free! Head over to the OSF project “Time-dependent Wavepackets and Photoionization – CS2” for more.

Photoionization dynamics – collected results from ePolyScat (ongoing)

An OSF project, collecting photoionization calculations (ePolyScat), and notes, is now available. This will be an ongoing resource for researchers in photoelectron spectroscopy, interferometry and related areas, and is part of our Open Science initiative.

Quantum Beat Photoelectron Imaging Spectroscopy of Xe in the VUV (2018)

Time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging: femtosecond UV-VUV pump-probe spectroscopy with the PImMS camera (2017)

Bootstrapping to the Molecular Frame with Time-domain Photoionization Interferometry (2017)

Time Delay in Molecular Photoionization (2016)

Let your data be free!

Monitoring Non-adiabatic Dynamics in CS2 with Time- and Energy-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra of Wavepackets

Monitoring Non-adiabatic Dynamics in CS2 with Time- and Energy-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra of Wavepackets

Feb. 2017 – New article in Chemical Physics Letters:

Monitoring Non-adiabatic Dynamics in CS2 with Time- and Energy-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra of Wavepackets

Kwanghsi Wang(a) Vincent McKoy(a)Paul Hockett(b)Albert Stolow(b, c, d),Michael S. Schuurman(b, d),

a A. A. Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA

b National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada

c Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 Canada

d Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada

Highlights

• Time-resolved photoelectron angular distributions around conical intersections are studied.
• Ab initio multiple spawning method is applied to obtain wavepacket densities.
• Geometry and energy dependent photoelectron matrix elements are employed.
• Molecular and laboratory photoelectron angular distributions are used to illustrate the non-adiabatic dynamics.
• Photoelectron spectra are compared with measured values.

Abstract

We report results from a novel fully ab initio method for simulating the time-resolved photoelectron angular distributions around conical intersections in CS2. The technique employs wavepacket densities obtained with the multiple spawning method in conjunction with geometry- and energy-dependent photoionization matrix elements. The robust agreement of the calculated molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions with measured values for CS2 demonstrates that this approach can successfully illuminate, and disentangle, the underlying coupled nuclear and electronic dynamics around conical intersections in polyatomic molecules.

DOI: 10.1016/j.cplett.2017.02.014

Time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging: femtosecond UV-VUV pump-probe spectroscopy with the PImMS camera

Time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging: femtosecond UV-VUV pump-probe spectroscopy with the PImMS camera

UPDATE: Dec. 2017

The figure above has made it as the JCP Christmas card!

The  full JCP special issue on Velocity Map Imaging Techniques is also now officially ready, see this page, or this PDF, for all the details.

UPDATE: 4th April 2017

The article is now published in the Journal of Chemical Physics, with an accompanying press release, The Inner Lives of Molecules, from AIP.

The full dataset and analysis scripts are now also available via OSF, DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/RRFK3.

Feb. 2017 – new article on the arXiv:

Time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging: femtosecond UV-VUV pump-probe spectroscopy with the PImMS camera

The Pixel-Imaging Mass Spectrometry (PImMS) camera allows for 3D charged particle imaging measurements, in which the particle time-of-flight is recorded along with (x,y) position. Coupling the PImMS camera to an ultrafast pump-probe velocity-map imaging spectroscopy apparatus therefore provides a route to time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging, with both high count rates and large dynamic range, thus allowing for rapid measurements of complex photofragmentation dynamics. Furthermore, the use of vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths for the probe pulse allows for an enhanced observation window for the study of excited state molecular dynamics in small polyatomic molecules having relatively high ionization potentials. Herein, preliminary time-resolved multi-mass imaging results from C2F3I photolysis are presented. The experiments utilized femtosecond UV and VUV (160.8~nm and 267~nm) pump and probe laser pulses in order to demonstrate and explore this new time-resolved experimental ion imaging configuration. The data indicates the depth and power of this measurement modality, with a range of photofragments readily observed, and many indications of complex underlying wavepacket dynamics on the excited state(s) prepared.

arXiv 1702.00744 (2017)

Now published in JCP:
The Journal of Chemical Physics 147, 013911 (2017);
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4978923

Also on Authorea, DOI: 10.22541/au.149030711.19068540

 

 

ePSproc: Post-processing suite for ePolyScat electron-molecule scattering calculations

ePSproc: Post-processing suite for ePolyScat electron-molecule scattering calculations

New on the arxiv:

ePSproc: Post-processing suite for ePolyScat electron-molecule scattering calculations

P. Hockett

https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.04043

ePSproc provides codes for post-processing results from ePolyScat (ePS), a suite of codes for the calculation of quantum scattering problems, developed and released by Luchesse & co-workers (Gianturco et al. 1994)(Natalense and Lucchese 1999)(R. R. Lucchese and Gianturco 2016). ePS is a powerful computational engine for solving scattering problems, but its inherent complexity, combined with additional post-processing requirements, ranging from simple visualizations to more complex processing involving further calculations based on ePS outputs, present a significant barrier to use for most researchers. ePSproc aims to lower this barrier by providing a range of functions for reading, processing and plotting outputs from ePS. Since ePS calculations are currently finding multiple applications in AMO physics (see below), ePSproc is expected to have significant reuse potential in the community, both as a basic tool-set for researchers beginning to use ePS, and as a more advanced post-processing suite for those already using ePS. ePSproc is currently written for Matlab/Octave, and distributed via Github: https://github.com/phockett/ePSproc.

 

https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.04043