Time-bin-to-polarization conversion of ultrafast photonic qubits

Time-bin-to-polarization conversion of ultrafast photonic qubits

Connor Kupchak, Philip J. Bustard, Khabat Heshami, Jennifer Erskine, Michael Spanner, Duncan G. England, and Benjamin J. Sussman
Phys. Rev. A 96, 053812 – Published 6 November 2017

The encoding of quantum information in photonic time-bin qubits is apt for long-distance quantum communication schemes. In practice, due to technical constraints such as detector response time, or the speed with which copolarized time-bins can be switched, other encodings, e.g., polarization, are often preferred for operations like state detection. Here, we present the conversion of qubits between polarization and time-bin encodings by using a method that is based on an ultrafast optical Kerr shutter and attain efficiencies of 97% and an average fidelity of 0.827±0.003 with shutter speeds near 1 ps. Our demonstration delineates an essential requirement for the development of hybrid and high-rate optical quantum networks.

Bootstrapping to the Molecular Frame with Time-domain Photoionization Interferometry

Bootstrapping to the Molecular Frame with Time-domain Photoionization Interferometry

Update August 2017 – this article is now published in PRL, under the alternative title Molecular Frame Reconstruction Using Time-Domain Photoionization Interferometry.
Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 083401 (2017), DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.083401

(Feb 2017) New manuscript on the arxiv:

Bootstrapping to the Molecular Frame with Time-domain Photoionization Interferometry

 

Photoionization of molecular species is, essentially, a multi-path interferometer with both experimentally controllable and intrinsic molecular characteristics. In this work, XUV photoionization of impulsively aligned molecular targets (N2) is used to provide a time-domain route to “complete” photoionization experiments, in which the rotational wavepacket controls the geometric part of the photoionization interferometer. The data obtained is sufficient to determine the magnitudes and phases of the ionization matrix elements for all observed channels, and to reconstruct molecular frame interferograms from lab frame measurements. In principle this methodology provides a time-domain route to complete photoionization experiments, and the molecular frame, which is generally applicable to any molecule (no prerequisites), for all energies and ionization channels.

arxiv 1701.08432 (2017)

Supplementary material (theory, data and code) available at DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.4480349.

Monitoring Non-adiabatic Dynamics in CS2 with Time- and Energy-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra of Wavepackets

Monitoring Non-adiabatic Dynamics in CS2 with Time- and Energy-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra of Wavepackets

Feb. 2017 – New article in Chemical Physics Letters:

Monitoring Non-adiabatic Dynamics in CS2 with Time- and Energy-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra of Wavepackets

Kwanghsi Wang(a) Vincent McKoy(a)Paul Hockett(b)Albert Stolow(b, c, d),Michael S. Schuurman(b, d),

a A. A. Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA

b National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada

c Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 Canada

d Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada

Highlights

• Time-resolved photoelectron angular distributions around conical intersections are studied.
• Ab initio multiple spawning method is applied to obtain wavepacket densities.
• Geometry and energy dependent photoelectron matrix elements are employed.
• Molecular and laboratory photoelectron angular distributions are used to illustrate the non-adiabatic dynamics.
• Photoelectron spectra are compared with measured values.

Abstract

We report results from a novel fully ab initio method for simulating the time-resolved photoelectron angular distributions around conical intersections in CS2. The technique employs wavepacket densities obtained with the multiple spawning method in conjunction with geometry- and energy-dependent photoionization matrix elements. The robust agreement of the calculated molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions with measured values for CS2 demonstrates that this approach can successfully illuminate, and disentangle, the underlying coupled nuclear and electronic dynamics around conical intersections in polyatomic molecules.

DOI: 10.1016/j.cplett.2017.02.014

Time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging: femtosecond UV-VUV pump-probe spectroscopy with the PImMS camera

Time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging: femtosecond UV-VUV pump-probe spectroscopy with the PImMS camera

UPDATE: 4th April 2017

The article is now published in the Journal of Chemical Physics, with an accompanying press release, The Inner Lives of Molecules, from AIP.

The full dataset and analysis scripts are now also available via OSF, DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/RRFK3.

Feb. 2017 – new article on the arXiv:

Time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging: femtosecond UV-VUV pump-probe spectroscopy with the PImMS camera

The Pixel-Imaging Mass Spectrometry (PImMS) camera allows for 3D charged particle imaging measurements, in which the particle time-of-flight is recorded along with (x,y) position. Coupling the PImMS camera to an ultrafast pump-probe velocity-map imaging spectroscopy apparatus therefore provides a route to time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging, with both high count rates and large dynamic range, thus allowing for rapid measurements of complex photofragmentation dynamics. Furthermore, the use of vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths for the probe pulse allows for an enhanced observation window for the study of excited state molecular dynamics in small polyatomic molecules having relatively high ionization potentials. Herein, preliminary time-resolved multi-mass imaging results from C2F3I photolysis are presented. The experiments utilized femtosecond UV and VUV (160.8~nm and 267~nm) pump and probe laser pulses in order to demonstrate and explore this new time-resolved experimental ion imaging configuration. The data indicates the depth and power of this measurement modality, with a range of photofragments readily observed, and many indications of complex underlying wavepacket dynamics on the excited state(s) prepared.

arXiv 1702.00744 (2017)

Now published in JCP:
The Journal of Chemical Physics 147, 013911 (2017);
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4978923

Also on Authorea, DOI: 10.22541/au.149030711.19068540

 

 

Augmented Reality with Hololens: Experiential Architectures Embedded in the Real World

Augmented Reality with Hololens: Experiential Architectures Embedded in the Real World

We’ve just finished a manuscript summarising our early work with the Hololens, including data visualization and interdisciplinary work.  This is a little different in flavour to our usual work, but will provide a solid foundation for more advanced work with the Hololens, including lab uses and more advanced data visualization.

Augmented Reality with Hololens: Experiential Architectures Embedded in the Real World

Paul Hockett & Tim Ingleby

Early hands-on experiences with the Microsoft Hololens augmented/mixed reality device are reported and discussed, with a general aim of exploring basic 3D visualization. A range of usage cases are tested, including data visualization and immersive data spaces, in-situ visualization of 3D models and full scale architectural form visualization. Ultimately, the Hololens is found to provide a remarkable tool for moving from traditional visualization of 3D objects on a 2D screen, to fully experiential 3D visualizations embedded in the real world.

The manuscript is currently available on Authorea, and the arxiv.

Phonon-Mediated Nonclassical Interference in Diamond

Phonon-Mediated Nonclassical Interference in Diamond

New paper in PRL:

Phonon-Mediated Nonclassical Interference in Diamond

Duncan G. England, Kent A. G. Fisher, Jean-Philippe W. MacLean, Philip J. Bustard, Khabat Heshami, Kevin J. Resch, and Benjamin J. Sussman
Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 073603 – Published 11 August 2016

 

Quantum interference of single photons is a fundamental aspect of many photonic quantum processing and communication protocols. Interference requires that the multiple pathways through an interferometer be temporally indistinguishable to within the coherence time of the photon. In this Letter, we use a diamond quantum memory to demonstrate interference between quantum pathways, initially temporally separated by many multiples of the optical coherence time. The quantum memory can be viewed as a light-matter beam splitter, mapping a THz-bandwidth single photon to a variable superposition of the output optical mode and stored phononic mode. Because the memory acts both as a beam splitter and as a buffer, the relevant coherence time for interference is not that of the photon, but rather that of the memory. We use this mechanism to demonstrate nonclassical single-photon and two-photon interference between quantum pathways initially separated by several picoseconds, even though the duration of the photons themselves is just 250fs.

Reading today…

Reading today…

Essential entanglement for atomic and molecular physics

Malte C Tichy, Florian Mintert and Andreas Buchleitner

Published 21 September 20112011 IOP Publishing Ltd
Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, Volume 44, Number 19

Entanglement is nowadays considered as a key quantity for the understanding of correlations, transport properties and phase transitions in composite quantum systems, and thus receives interest beyond the engineered applications in the focus of quantum information science. We review recent experimental and theoretical progress in the study of quantum correlations under that wider perspective, with an emphasis on rigorous definitions of the entanglement of identical particles, and on entanglement studies in atoms and molecules.

Frequency and bandwidth conversion of single photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory

Frequency and bandwidth conversion of single photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory

Our recent paper on quantum optical signal processing is now published in Nature Communications:

Frequency and bandwidth conversion of single photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory
Nature Communications 7, 11200, 2016
Kent A.G. Fisher, Duncan G. England, Jean-Philippe W. MacLean, Philip J. Bustard, Kevin J. Resch & Benjamin J. Sussman

The spectral manipulation of photons is essential for linking components in a quantum network. Large frequency shifts are needed for conversion between optical and telecommunication frequencies, while smaller shifts are useful for frequency-multiplexing quantum systems, in the same way that wavelength division multiplexing is used in classical communications. Here we demonstrate frequency and bandwidth conversion of single photons in a room-temperature diamond quantum memory. Heralded 723.5 nm photons, with 4.1 nm bandwidth, are stored as optical phonons in the diamond via a Raman transition. Upon retrieval from the diamond memory, the spectral shape of the photons is determined by a tunable read pulse through the reverse Raman transition. We report central frequency tunability over 4.2 times the input bandwidth, and bandwidth modulation between 0.5 and 1.9 times the input bandwidth. Our results demonstrate the potential for diamond, and Raman memories in general, as an integrated platform for photon storage and spectral conversion.

April 2016 – Article in Nature Communications

Oct. 2015 – Article on the arxiv

Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances

Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances

New article in the Journal of Modern Optics

Pages 2005-2028 | Received 06 Nov 2015, Accepted 27 Dec 2015, Published online: 16 Mar 2016

 

Quantum light–matter interfaces are at the heart of photonic quantum technologies. Quantum memories for photons, where non-classical states of photons are mapped onto stationary matter states and preserved for subsequent retrieval, are technical realizations enabled by exquisite control over interactions between light and matter. The ability of quantum memories to synchronize probabilistic events makes them a key component in quantum repeaters and quantum computation based on linear optics. This critical feature has motivated many groups to dedicate theoretical and experimental research to develop quantum memory devices. In recent years, exciting new applications, and more advanced developments of quantum memories, have proliferated. In this review, we outline some of the emerging applications of quantum memories in optical signal processing, quantum computation and non-linear optics. We review recent experimental and theoretical developments, and their impacts on more advanced photonic quantum technologies based on quantum memories.