Time-bin-to-polarization conversion of ultrafast photonic qubits

Time-bin-to-polarization conversion of ultrafast photonic qubits

Connor Kupchak, Philip J. Bustard, Khabat Heshami, Jennifer Erskine, Michael Spanner, Duncan G. England, and Benjamin J. Sussman
Phys. Rev. A 96, 053812 – Published 6 November 2017

The encoding of quantum information in photonic time-bin qubits is apt for long-distance quantum communication schemes. In practice, due to technical constraints such as detector response time, or the speed with which copolarized time-bins can be switched, other encodings, e.g., polarization, are often preferred for operations like state detection. Here, we present the conversion of qubits between polarization and time-bin encodings by using a method that is based on an ultrafast optical Kerr shutter and attain efficiencies of 97% and an average fidelity of 0.827±0.003 with shutter speeds near 1 ps. Our demonstration delineates an essential requirement for the development of hybrid and high-rate optical quantum networks.

Bootstrapping to the Molecular Frame with Time-domain Photoionization Interferometry

Bootstrapping to the Molecular Frame with Time-domain Photoionization Interferometry

Update August 2017 – this article is now published in PRL, under the alternative title Molecular Frame Reconstruction Using Time-Domain Photoionization Interferometry.
Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 083401 (2017), DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.083401

(Feb 2017) New manuscript on the arxiv:

Bootstrapping to the Molecular Frame with Time-domain Photoionization Interferometry

 

Photoionization of molecular species is, essentially, a multi-path interferometer with both experimentally controllable and intrinsic molecular characteristics. In this work, XUV photoionization of impulsively aligned molecular targets (N2) is used to provide a time-domain route to “complete” photoionization experiments, in which the rotational wavepacket controls the geometric part of the photoionization interferometer. The data obtained is sufficient to determine the magnitudes and phases of the ionization matrix elements for all observed channels, and to reconstruct molecular frame interferograms from lab frame measurements. In principle this methodology provides a time-domain route to complete photoionization experiments, and the molecular frame, which is generally applicable to any molecule (no prerequisites), for all energies and ionization channels.

arxiv 1701.08432 (2017)

Supplementary material (theory, data and code) available at DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.4480349.

Photoionization Interferometry & Metrology

Photoionization Interferometry & Metrology

Photoionization is a complex quantum mechanical process, with a range of interfering channels playing a role in even the simplest case. For problems in quantum metrology and sensing, a detailed understanding of the process is desirable for accurate measurements; quantum control is also a possible outcome of such understanding. New research in this area will build on recent cutting-edge work at NRC (see below), which probed the fundamental quantum physics of photoionization in atoms and molecules, and metrology work which demonstrated the retrieval of electron wavefunctions via interferometric time-domain measurements.

Four areas of photoionization interferometry are the target of current research:

  1. Metrology and control with rotational wavepackets.
  2. Metrology and control with shaped laser pulses.
  3. Quantum dynamics probed via photoionization interferometry.
  4. Fundamental properties of photoion and photoelectron coherence.

Depending on interests and experience, project work will be in one (or more) of these areas.

An introduction to this topic, and recent work, can be found in Paul’s DAMOP 2017 talk Phase-sensitive Photoelectron Metrology (below), and via our blog.

Phase-sensitive Photoelectron Metrology – Dr. P. Hockett, presentation at DAMOP 2017 from femtolab.ca on Vimeo.

Phase-sensitive Photoelectron Metrology (presentation at DAMOP 2017)

Phase-sensitive Photoelectron Metrology (presentation at DAMOP 2017)

Slides for Paul’s DAMOP talk are now available on figshare (DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.5049142).

Photoionization is an interferometric process, in which multiple paths can contribute to the final continuum photoelectron state. At the simplest level, interferences between different final angular momentum states are manifest in the energy and angle resolved photoelectron spectra: metrology schemes making use of these interferograms are thus phase-sensitive, and provide a powerful route to detailed understanding of photoionization [1]. At a more complex level, such measurements can also provide a powerful probe for other processes of interest, for example: (a) dynamical process in time-resolved measurements, such as rotational, vibrational and electronic wavepackets, and (b) in order to understand and develop control schemes [1]. In this talk recent work in this vein will be discussed, touching on “complete” photoionization studies of atoms and molecules with shaped laser pulses [1,2] and XUV [3], metrology schemes using Angle-Resolved RABBIT, and molecular photoionization dynamics in the time-domain (Wigner delays) [4].

[1] Hockett, P. et. al. (2015). Phys. Rev. A, 92, 13412. [2] Hockett, P. et. al. (2014). Phys. Rev. Lett., 112, 223001. [3] Marceau, C. et. al. (2017). Submitted. DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.4480349. [4] Hockett, P. et. al. (2016). J. Phys B, 49, 95602.

Update 29th June 2017 – a video of the talk is now also available.

Phase-sensitive Photoelectron Metrology – Dr. P. Hockett, presentation at DAMOP 2017 from femtolab.ca on Vimeo.

Time-dependent Wavepackets and Photoionization – CS2

Time-dependent Wavepackets and Photoionization – CS2

Our ongoing work on the calculation of time-dependent wavepackets and observables in photoionization is now collected in an OSF project (DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/RJMPD). Aspects of this work have previously been published, but much of the detail and methodology underlying the calculations has remained sitting on our computers. As part of our Open Science Initiative, we’re letting this data go free! Head over to the OSF project “Time-dependent Wavepackets and Photoionization – CS2” for more.

Figure shows TRPADs results (a) Calculated TRPADs (0.7eV) (b), (c) Comparison with expt. TRPADs (discrete times).

Reading today…

Reading today…

Nonlinear quantum optics mediated by Rydberg interactions

O Firstenberg, C S Adams and S Hofferberth

Published 30 June 2016© 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd
Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, Volume 49, Number 15
Special Issue on Rydberg Atomic Physics

By mapping the strong interaction between Rydberg excitations in ultra-cold atomic ensembles onto single photons via electromagnetically induced transparency, it is now possible to realize a medium which exhibits a strong optical nonlinearity at the level of individual photons. We review the theoretical concepts and the experimental state-of-the-art of this exciting new field, and discuss first applications in the field of all-optical quantum information processing.

DOI: 10.1088/0953-4075/49/15/152003

Fascinating insight into the topic, which utilises the properties of Rydberg matter to enable traditional non-linear optics to cross over to the quantum regime. From the intro:

One remarkable success of advances in ultra-cold Rydberg physics is the realization of a medium with a large optical nonlinearity at the single photon level [1–3]. Highly excited Rydberg atoms bring something new to the history of optics as they enable quantum nonlinear media where photons are strongly interacting!

Recommended.

Angle-resolved RABBIT: theory and numerics

Angle-resolved RABBIT: theory and numerics

Update 28/06/17 – Now published in J. Phys. B, special issue on Correlations in Light-Matter Interactions.

New manuscript:

Angle-resolved RABBIT: theory and numerics

P. Hockett

Angle-resolved (AR) RABBIT measurements offer a high information content measurement scheme, due to the presence of multiple, interfering, ionization channels combined with a phase-sensitive observable in the form of angle and time-resolved photoelectron interferograms. In order to explore the characteristics and potentials of AR-RABBIT, a perturbative 2-photon model is developed; based on this model, example AR-RABBIT results are computed for model and real systems, for a range of RABBIT schemes. These results indicate some of the phenomena to be expected in AR-RABBIT measurements, and suggest various applications of the technique in photoionization metrology.

Paul Hockett 2017 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 50 154002

Pre-print available via Authorea, DOI: 10.22541/au.149037518.89916908.

arXiv 1703.08586 (2017) 

See also the recent AR-RABBIT presentation for a brief intro to this topic.

Angle-resolved RABBIT: new work and presentation

Angle-resolved RABBIT: new work and presentation

The above image shows simulated velocity map images (left, middle) and angle and time-resolved measurements (right) for angle-resolved RABBIT measurements. In this type of measurement, XUV and IR pulses are combined, and create a set of 1 and 2-photon bands in the photoelectron spectrum. The presence of multiple interfering pathways to each final photoelectron band (energy) results in complex and information rich interferograms, with both angle and time-dependence.

A manuscript detailing this work is currently in preparation, and a recent presentation detailing some aspects of the work can be found on Figshare.

Update 24th March – new manuscript, Angle-resolved RABBIT: theory and numerics, pre-print available.

Reading today…

Reading today…

First On-Sky Fringes with an Up-Conversion Interferometer Tested on a Telescope Array

P. Darré, R. Baudoin, J.-T. Gomes, N. J. Scott, L. Delage, L. Grossard, J. Sturmann, C. Farrington, F. Reynaud, and T. A. Ten Brummelaar
Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 233902 – Published 29 November 2016

10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.233902

The Astronomical Light Optical Hybrid Analysis project investigates the combined use of a telescope array interferometer and nonlinear optics to propose a new generation of instruments dedicated to high-resolution imaging for infrared astronomy. The nonlinear process of optical frequency conversion transfers the astronomical light to a shorter wavelength domain. Here, we report on the first fringes obtained on the sky with the prototype operated at 1.55μm in the astronomical H band and implemented on the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy telescope array. This seminal result allows us to foresee a future extension to the challenging midinfrared spectral domain.

This is quite interesting as an application of photon up-conversion at low-light levels – in this case for interferometric IR telescope arrays.  The demo in the paper doesn’t show any improvement on the existing configuration (i.e. no non-linear optical step), but in principle could: once one factors in not just lossy detection in the IR, but also lossy beam transport (in the conceptually similar VLTI system it’s about 10% efficient).

The header image shows fig. 1 from the paper.